Tag: History

Eye of Nefertiti by Maria Luisa Lang

Posted August 20, 2017 by karenbaron in Animals, Cats, Fantasy, Fiction, Review, Time Travel / 0 Comments

I received this book for free from in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Eye of Nefertiti by Maria Luisa LangThe Eye of Nefertiti by Maria Luisa Lang
Series: The Pharaoh's Cat #2
Series Rating: five-stars
on November 29, 2016
Genres: Fantasy
Pages: 208
Format: Kindle
five-stars

The cat must free Queen Nefertiti from a horrific curse

The Eye of Nefertiti is both a stand-alone novel and a sequel to The Pharaoh’s Cat. The time-traveling ancient Egyptian feline with human powers returns together with his beloved Pharaoh and his close friends, the High Priest of Amun-Ra and Elena, an Egyptologist’s daughter.

The cat is quick-witted, wise-cracking narrator as well as free-spirited, ever-curious protagonist, and the story he tells is an exotic, imaginative, spell-binding tragicomedy. The cat travels from present-day New York City to England, both ancient and modern, then to ancient Egypt, where he confronts a horrible demon and experiences a sublime emotion. Once back in England, he descends into a psychological abyss so deep only the Pharaoh can save him.

The Eye of Nefertiti interweaves feline and human, past and present, natural and supernatural. It contains numerous surprises, twists and turns, intriguing characters, both human and animal, fascinating revelations about ancient Egyptian history and culture, and an ingenious application of the Tarot and an Italian opera.

Time travel, mystery, love and a Cat.

Eye of Nefertiti by Maria Luisa Lang is a cat’s story. This is the first adult story that I have read where the protagonist is a cat, but he is way more than your average cat. Wrappa-Hamen is a magic cat, he talks, walks on two legs, reads, writes, and eats human food. He is also the Pharaoh’s cat, although he does go by many names in this book.

I first thought the concept was good, this will be a good story, I mean ancient Egypt and cats…but once I got into the story I found that its fabulous. Ms. Lang does an awesome job with the character Wrappa-Hamen, he is a cat but he has such personality (not that regular cats don’t). She really nails Wrappa-Hamen’s priorities, such as food first, sleep second. He is vain and has an attitude. Yet, can be so loving when he wants to be. See, very cat like. However, if my daughter’s cat Mia, could talk, I’m not sure I would want to hear what is on her mind. I think most of it would be about the dog.

The family that Wrappa-Hamen lives with, have such character. Elena is bossy, and definitely keeps them moving, she is the mother of the Pharaoh. Then there is the High Priest, who is a total book worm and at times clueless (father of the Pharaoh). And the young Pharaoh, who is now an adorable toddler, who loves Wrappa-Hamen.

The settings were stunning, I was able to see them all so vividly. I think that time travel would be wonderful. The mystery was good, I enjoyed the clues and the explanations. A completely wonderful book, which makes my rating 5 stars. As the Baroness says anything that keeps you up at night is worth the stars.

**Eye of Nefertiti**

** Goodreads **        

This is a Guest Review for Baroness’ Book Trove. Thank you for the opportunity to review this book for your site. ~Jen

five-stars

About Maria Luisa Lang

Maria Luisa Lang has published two novels, The Pharaoh’s Cat and The Eye of Nefertiti, which is both a sequel to The Pharaoh’s Cat and a stand-alone novel. She was born in Rome, Italy, and lives in New York City. She often returns to Italy to visit her family and has stayed for extended periods in Bath and London. She has a degree in art from the City University of New York, and her artwork has been exhibited in New York galleries. She is an amateur Egyptologist. Her love of cats and ancient Egypt has inspired her to write two novels set there with a very special cat as her protagonist. Both The Pharaoh’s Cat and The Eye of Nefertiti are available on Amazon in paperback and in a Kindle edition.


A Ghostly Light by Juliet Blackwell

Posted August 19, 2017 by karenbaron in Cozy, Dogs, Ghosts, Guest Post, Mystery, Paranormal Mystery, Review, Series, Urban / 0 Comments

A Ghostly Light by Juliet BlackwellA Ghostly Light by Juliet Blackwell
Published by Berkley on June 4th 2017
Genres: Cozy, Mystery, Paranormal
Pages: 330
Format: Kindle
five-stars

In the latest mystery from the New York Times bestselling author of Give Up the Ghost, it will take a beacon of ghostly intervention to guide contractor Mel Turner to the truth... Dangerous tides ahead...  When her friend Alicia hires Turner Construction to renovate a historic lighthouse in the San Francisco Bay, Mel Turner can’t wait to get her hands dirty. Alicia plans to transform the island property into a welcoming inn, and while Mel has never attempted a project so ambitious—or so tall—before, she’s definitely up for the challenge.   But trouble soon arises when Alicia’s abusive ex-husband shows up to threaten both her and Mel, and later turns up dead at the base of the lighthouse stairs. With no other suspects in sight, things start looking choppy for Alicia. Now, if Mel wants to clear her friend’s name, she’ll need the help of the lighthouse’s resident ghosts to shine a light on the real culprit...

This lighthouse holds more than just light.

A Ghostly Light by Juliet Blackwell this is one of my favorite series. I truly love the mix of history, home renovation, paranormal, mystery and the quirkiness of San Francisco and the bay area.

The world that Ms. Blackwell has created by mixing fact and fiction is so believable. Honestly, I would like to hire Turner Construction just to be a little part of this world.

I really think that Mel is shining in this addition. It’s nice to see her with her new man Landon. She is so happy. She still has things to work on (such as her recent fear of heights0 but don’t we all. She is finally working through all of her jobs: ghost, construction or murder. Landon is extremely supportive. It’s so sweet.

Mel has two mysteries to solve: the recent murder that her friend has been accused of and the mystery of the lighthouse ghost. Ms. Blackwell does such a great job keeping the whole thing moving through the past, present and glimpses of the future.

I adored the lighthouse history that was included with the story. The treasure maps were so thoughtful. What a wonderful way to teach and entertain your child, so much better than handing them a cellphone to play with.

I found this quote online and thought it was such a great fit for this story. “Books are lighthouses erected in the great sea of time.” ~E.P. Whipple

My rating is 5 stars, of course. If you haven’t read the other books you should try the first book in the series, Home Renovation or you can just start with this one. I guarantee you will want more. Mel and her entourage are worth your time.

**A Ghostly Light**

** Goodreads **        

This is a Guest Review for Baroness’ Book Trove. Thank you for the opportunity to review this book for your site. ~Jen

five-stars

About Juliet Blackwell

Juliet Blackwell was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, the youngest child of a jet pilot from New York and an editor from Texas. She graduated with a degree in Latin American Studies from University of California, Santa Cruz, and went on to earn Masters degrees in Anthropology and Social Work from the State University of New York, Albany.

While in graduate school she published several articles based on her research with immigrant families from Mexico and Viet Nam, as well as one full-length translation: Miguel León-Portilla’s seminal work, Endangered Cultures. Juliet taught Medical Anthropology at SUNY-Albany, was a producer for a BBC documentary about Vietnamese children left behind by US soldiers, and worked as an elementary school social worker in rural New York. Upon her return to California, she became a professional artist and ran her own decorative painting, historical renovation, and domestic design studio for more than a decade.

In addition to mainstream novels, Juliet pens the New York Times Bestselling Witchcraft Mysteries and the Haunted Home Renovation series. As Hailey Lind, she wrote the Agatha Award-nominated Art Lover’s Mystery series. She is past president of Northern California Sisters in Crime and former board member of Mystery Writers of America.

Juliet lives in a hundred-year-old house with extensive botanical gardens in Northern California but spends as much time as possible in Europe and Latin America. She believes in the magic of language, travel, and cultural exchange to open hearts, minds, and souls.


Indiana Belle by John A. Heldt

Posted February 21, 2017 by karenbaron in Adult Fiction, Adventure, Fiction, Review, Romance, Science Fiction, Series, Time Travel / 0 Comments

I received this book for free from in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Indiana Belle by John A. HeldtIndiana Belle by John A. Heldt
Series: American Journey #3
Series Rating: five-stars
on April 14th 2016
Genres: Fantasy, Fiction, Romance
Pages: 406
Format: Kindle
five-stars

Providence, Rhode Island, 2017. When doctoral student Cameron Coelho, 28, opens a package from Indiana, he finds more than private papers that will help him with his dissertation. He finds a photograph of a beautiful society editor murdered in 1925 and clues to a century-old mystery. Within days, he meets Geoffrey Bell, the "time-travel professor," and begins an unlikely journey through the Roaring Twenties. Filled with history, romance, and intrigue, INDIANA BELLE follows a lonely soul on the adventure of a lifetime as he searches for love and answers in the age of Prohibition, flappers, and jazz.

My take on this book:              First off I am so terribly sorry for this very late review on this book. I am very glad once again for Mr. Heldt for asking me to read and review this book. This book has three different third person point of view chapters scattered throughout the book.

The main character is Cameron Coelho. He is a twenty-eight-year-old doctoral student who is working on his dissertation of the Mid-West during the Roaring Twenties. What I like about him is that despite being a very rich young man he acts like a normal college student trying to finish his degree. I also like how he tries to keep his promise to Geoffrey and himself. Cameron overall is a great and wonderful guy who tries to be a good person despite the trouble that finds him in 1925.

What I like about him is that despite being a very rich young man he acts like a normal college student trying to finish his degree. I also like how he tries to keep his promise to Geoffrey and himself. Cameron overall is a great and wonderful guy who tries to be a good person despite the trouble that finds him in 1925.

What I don’t like about Cameron Coelho is that he can be a bit too overprotective especially of Candice once they get together. I don’t know if you call this a dislike but I kind of found it strange that he fell in love with Candice without meeting her in person. This is truly a minor issue for this character, though, as Mr. Heldt has written him so well that he is very three dimensional in my honest opinion.

The second character is Candice Bell. She is a twenty-five-year-old society writer that lives in 1925 Evansville, Indiana. What I like about Miss Bell is that she has many sides to her that even we, the readers, don’t know all of them. We see her Mid-Western hospitality, the way that she acts as if she can do no wrong in front of her mother, along with how she acts tough when following a lead for a story, she is very stubborn when she is trying to do something that she knows is the right thing to do, and among many others. Candice Bell, in my humble opinion, is much like most women back then would have been. Reading about her is like being able to have a sneak peek into their lives back then. What else I liked about Candice is that she seemed to keep Cameron guessing since the first time they meet face to face.

What I like about Miss Bell is that she has many sides to her that even we, the readers, don’t know all of them. We see her Mid-Western hospitality, the way that she acts as if she can do no wrong in front of her mother, along with how she acts tough when following a lead for a story, she is very stubborn when she is trying to do something that she knows is the right thing to do, and among many others. Candice Bell, in my humble opinion, is much like most women back then would have been. Reading about her is like being able to have a sneak peek into their lives back then. What else I liked about Candice is that she seemed to keep Cameron guessing since the first time they meet face to face.

What I dislike about her is the fact that she was writing articles that were putting her in danger. I know that is something that she loves to do but I just can’t believe that she did that. She should have been thinking about might happen if she exposed these secrets, she might get herself into trouble. I also dislike that she couldn’t see who was one of the ringleaders, that she was trying to put away. Good thing that Cameron helped save her.

For the antagonist, I am still having a hard time deciding. At first, I thought it was time itself seeing as how Cameron is from the year 2017 while Candice is from 1925. Then I thought Geoffrey as I remembered that he told Cameron to not save Candice since she was supposed to die in 1925 so his great-great-great grandparents could meet. Seeing as Geoffrey is Candice’s cousin. However, what I liked about Geoffrey is that he is very cautious regarding information about his time machine and who he allowed to use it. I also liked how he willingly helped Cameron.

What I disliked is that he made Cameron promise him to not get involved with Candice. Another thing I disliked about him is that he wanted to be kept in the loop on almost everything that was going on with Cameron in Indiana.

What moved me about this story is Cameron’s determination to save Candice despite Geoffrey telling him not to. I totally loved the settings and the time travel. I felt like I was transported there through his words so I could be there with the characters. My favorite supporting character I think would have to be Geoffrey’s wife. Mostly because she is extremely observant and sees things that no one else does.

Indiana Belle by John A. Heldt is an amazing book. I am giving this book a five star rating since I couldn’t stop thinking about it at all. In my mind, Mr. Heldt is a fantastic writer that can take you to place you never imagined. I also like his way of time travel as it is different than what we are used to seeing/reading about. This is the second book by him that I have read and I can’t wait to read his other books.

Anyways until next time enjoy this book review brought to you by

Baroness’ Book Trove.

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About John A. Heldt

John A. Heldt is the author of the critically acclaimed Northwest Passage and American Journey series. The former reference librarian and award-winning sportswriter has loved getting subjects and verbs to agree since writing book reports on baseball heroes in grade school. A graduate of the University of Oregon and the University of Iowa, Heldt is an avid fisherman, sports fan, home brewer, and reader of thrillers and historical fiction.


The Odd Fellows Society by CG Barrett

Posted September 20, 2016 by karenbaron in Adult Fiction, Fiction, Mystery, Read-a-thon, Review, Thriller / 0 Comments

I received this book for free from in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

The Odd Fellows Society by CG BarrettThe Odd Fellows Society on November 12th 2015
Genres: Fiction
Pages: 334
Format: Kindle
five-stars

Santiago Torres, the Jesuit headmaster of one of Washington, D.C.'s top high schools, knows two truths. First, historian Jasper Willoughs, his closest friend, didn't toss himself off a dormitory roof. Second, a Georgetown University secret society-a running joke on campus-has blood on its hands. Torres's pursuit of the truth embroils him in a bizarre and deadly scavenger hunt. The clues, scratched out on parchment by the mysterious Odd Fellows Society, lead Santi to risk everything he holds sacred: his job, his life, even the woman he secretly loves. As for his relationship with his God? Well, that's complicated. A hold-your-breath thriller that explores America's national obsession with race, The Odd Fellows Society will have you looking at the U.S. capital-and its monuments' secrets-in a whole different shade of black and white. Note: While this novel's protagonist is a Jesuit, this book is not a religious book.

My take on this novel:             The Odd Fellows Society by C.G. Barrett took me on a surprisingly good mystery that made me want to keep on reading. I was hooked from the email that the author sent me and the plot. Although, the life of a book blogger sometimes means I need to wait to read a book as I I have other commitments. Once I opened the book on my kindle fire I was once again reminded why I wanted to read it.

The Odd Fellows Society reminded me of a mixture of two great series. The first one is Dan Brown’s books with Robert Langdon, with the church and the teaching/history of the priesthood. The second one is National Treasure for the clues of using some pieces of our history, the baddies, and the history as well. I love both of these series. As I reading this book it reminded me of those two series which prompted me to read more to discover what happens next every single time.

I was instantly mesmerized with this novel. I wanted to know what happened next and what the clues meant. I was surprised in a few areas of the books as I didn’t expect what happened (such great plot shifts). Overall, this book caught me off guard and exceeded my expectations. That is always a good thing. This book is also not like one that I normally read. I try to stay away from ones that deal with religion. Unless the plot is really something, like this book and the Robert Langdon ones as well.

I am giving this book five stars as it is an outstanding read that I am glad I took the chance on. The characters are all perfectly developed and some plots twist I completely didn’t expect. The mystery was superb. I would and will recommend this really awesome book to anyone who loves a good mystery.

Anyways until the next time enjoy this book review brought to you by

Baroness’ Book Trove.

“ Where to find The Odd Fellows Society**

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About CG Barrett

A native of Northeast Pennsylvania, C.G. Barrett received a B.A. from Johns Hopkins University and a M.A. from George Mason University.

A former teacher and student of history, Barrett currently serves as publisher of a Tampa newsmagazine. His humor writing about life as a parent has appeared in over a dozen parenting magazines throughout the United States.

Barrett’s popular novels have included both young adult and adult fiction in the genres of fantasy and mystery. His love of mythology, fairy tales, history and politics is evident in his fiction, which frequently explores spirituality, family and identity in a rapidly changing world.

Barrett lives with his wife, his three daughters and his two Shetland Sheepdogs in Tampa, Florida.